DIY Help & Tips

Useful Terms

TermExplanation
Backplate The plate which a door hande is mounted upon (Lever on Backplate door handes)
Bathroom Lock A lock which can be fitted to an interior door. It has a latch function which works with the door lever, and a bolt function operated by a turn and release mechinism. This lock can be used with both Lever on Backplate and Lever on Rose door handles (seperate thumbturn and release will need to be bought for Lever on Rose door handles)
Rose Square or circular plate which a door handle is mounted (Lever on Rose door handle)
Deadlock A standard mortice lock, fitting into the edge of a door. Contains a sqaure ended bolt operated by a key or thumbturn and release
Escutcheon A plate used to cover a key hole cut into a door
Latch Spring loaded tongue, which is operated and turned by a handle. This mechnism simply secures the door shut, but does not lock the door
Lever The horizonal bar resting on the pivot, and moves when pressure is applied. Simply put, it's what you touch when you open a door
Mortice Knob A door knob with a spindle, which can be used to operate a latch
Sash Lock A mortice lock containing a latch, which is operated by the door lever, and a bolt, operated by a locking key
Spndle A square bar inserted through latch. It connects the handles on either side of the door, and allows the latch tongue to operate
Strike Plate A plate fixted to the inside of a door frame, which connects with the latch and/or bolt. 
Thumbturn The locking mechnism, which can lock a door simply turning it. Used when a key is not required i.e. bathrooms
Tubular Latch Used for latch door handles, and fitted into the door. Allows a latch door handle to turn, and used on any standard interior door where a locking mechinism is not required
Thumbturn & Release The locking mechnism, which can lock a door from the inside by simply turning it for privacy purposes. The lock can also be unlocked from the outside with a coin or screwdriver in emergencies. Used in bathrooms

Help & Tips for Buying Door Handles

An Introduction to Buying Door Handles

There are two types of door handles to choose from. Lever on Backplate door handles, which are traditional and more widely used, or Lever on Rose door handles, which are contemporary and modern.

You also have an alternative option to use a mortice door knob.

The type of door you are fitting your handle to will affect the type of handle and hardware you need.

To fit a door handle to a door, you need a pair of door handles with screws & fittings (Hiatt Hardware supply all screws & fittings with door handles) and a lock or latch.

Lever on Backplate vs Lever on Rose Door Handles

Lever on Backplate door handles, which are traditional and more widely used, or Lever on Rose door handles, which are contemporary and modern.

Lever on Backplate handles are handles where the lever is mounted onto a rectangular plate, known as a backplate.

Lever on Rose handles are handles where the lever is mounted onto a rose, known as a backplate.

Lever on Rose handles offer a flush finish as they hide the screws and fixings, making them ideal in modern and contemporary interior styles.

Lever on Backplate Door Handles - Latch vs Lock vs Bathroom

Lever on Backplate handles offer three different styles, depending on it's usage.

Lever latch handles- blank backplate, used for a standard interior room which isn't a bathroom or requires any locking functionality, these handles should be combined with a tubular latch

Lever lock handles - backplate with a keyhole, where you require the room to be locked, these handles should be combined with a sash lock

Bathroom handles - backplate with built-in turn & release functionality, these handles should be used with a bathroom lock

Replacing Door Handles vs Fitting Brand New Door Handles

If you're simply replacing a door handle on a current door, you may be able to directly fit a new door handle onto your door. You will need to check the size of the door handle will fit the current screw holes and door lock or latch. If not, you will need to screw in new holes for the bigger/smaller door handle. Also if you're changing the lock style on your door, you will also need a new latch or lock

If you're fitting a new door handle to a new door, you will need a pair of door handles, along with a latch or lock.

Which Latch and Lock do I Need?

Latch - standard turn functionality, can be used with both Lever on Backplate and Lever on Rose door handles

Sash lock or deadlock - when you require your door to be locked with a keyhole and key

Bathroom lock - allows for fitting to a bathroom door handle with thumb-turn release, if fitting with a Lever on Rose door handle, a thumbturn and release will need to be purchased seperately 

What Tools do I Need to Fit a Door Handle?

If you're simply replacing a door handle with no changes to the latch, lock or screw fittings, all you need is a Slotted or Phillips head screwdriver and safety goggles.

Please consult a qualified tradesperson if you are not sure how to install the product.

Help & Tips for Buying Cabinet Handles

An Introduction to Buying Cabinet Handles

Cabinet handles or knobs can add great style to your home by complimenting your cabinet doors and drawers. However, they are not just mere decorative hardware but have an important ergonomic part while using your cabinets.

Handles and knobs are quick and easy to install and is inexpensive DIY project.

Tools for Fitting a Cabinet Handle

You will need the following tools to fit a handle to a new cabinet:

  • Kitchen cabinet handles or knobs
  • Measuring tape
  • Power drill
  • G-clamp (optional)
  • Phillips head screwdriver
  • Pencil
  • Drawer handle drilling guide (optional)

If you're replacing your current handles and knobs, you may need less tools as the job will be much simpler.

How to fit cabinet handles and knobs (phase 1 - preparation)

Prepare - Firstly, you may want to ensure your kitchen cabinets are clean and dust-free. Clean them with a simple wet wipe and dry with a kitchen towel or cloth.

Also read the cabinet manufacturer’s instructions to ensure you’re preparing the cabinets in the right way. The door and drawer handle manufacturers’ instructions will also assist you here.

How to fit cabinet handles and knobs (phase 2 - plan)

Plan - Decide on the position of your handle or knob. Base unit handles and knobs should be mounted towards the top of the door for effortless access. Wall unit handles and knobs should be mounted towards the bottom of the door, and drawer handles and knobs should be mounted in the centre. Both base and wall unit drawers and knobs should also be located closer to the leading edge (opening side) of the unit.

Once you have decided the position, mark the drilling points on the door or drawer unit with a pencil. Double check the handle or knob again against your pencil marks to check you are happy with the location.

How to fit cabinet handles and knobs (phase 3 - drill)

Drill holes from the front of the door or drawer to the back. Use a slightly larger drill bit than the screws of the handle or knob.

Use a G-clamp to attach a piece of wood to the outside of the open door. This will avoid splinters. You can also drill halfway from the front of the door to the back, then drill halfway from the bank to the front of the door.

Also remember to remove any pencil marks now before you begin screwing the handles or knobs to the door.

How to fit cabinet handles and knobs (phase 4 - screw on)

Screw on your handle or knob Now you can begin screwing on your handle or knob. Insert the screws from the inside pointing out. For handles, start with one screw until it’s almost completely tight with some wiggle room.

Now screw the other part of the handle completely tight, before moving back to the first screw to tighten completely.

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